Country Living

contributed by Peter Malik

We all know that nature is not always cute and benign. While direct clashes are not that common in our parts they do happen. So it was earlier this week when I arrived at the house. Upon opening the door I encountered knocked-over lamps, torn clothes, even a chair on its back. All over the floor and furniture were whiteish spots and splashes — some small, some quite big — which were clearly bird poop. Then I saw the door to the fire place open: and since we always close it before leaving it didn’t take a genius to conclude that the avian intruder entered the house via the chimney.

The startling thing was that the carnage was literally in every room, on both floors. As I cleaned, stripped beds and generally started putting things back together I kept thinking: is the bird still somewhere here and alive? Or dead? Unlikely it found a way out via the chimney again … It all felt anxiously exciting and somewhat spooky. Fast forward a couple of hours, no bird found and the house more or less back to normal; and then it occurred to me to look into the basement, the only place I haven’t been yet. Sure enough, there it was: a beautiful, large hawk, lying next to the boiler, interestingly with no signs of any injury.

The coda is disappointing. I took it to the compost, planning to return a bit later to take a picture that I can send to someone better than me at birds. But when I came back I found not a trace. A coyote or some such chanced upon a meal and took it home (the chance the hawk woke up and flew away is remote I think). So I will never know who the visitor was … maybe it’s enough to know that it was one of the faces of nature.

Two Events for July 20

Hello Friends, Please come enjoy the garden on our Open Day Saturday, July 20th from 10:00-4:00. We’ve been working hard to get the place ready for you!

Here is the link for information and directions. You can buy tickets online or just come and sign in here. (All proceeds go the Garden Conservancy.) You can go to any or all of the three gardens in Delaware County chosen by the Conservancy.

https://www.gardenconservancy.org/open-days/garden-directory/henderson-hollow-farm-mermer-blakeslee-eric-hamerstrom

Please feel free to forward this to anyone you know who loves gardens. Looking forward to seeing you, Mermer and Eric

Admission to this garden is $10 per person.
Children 12 and under are free.

Memorial Day FRIENDraiser 2018 at Mimi and Simone McGurl’s

Submitted by Simone

Dear Friends –

It was wonderful to see so many of you at our first ever Memorial Day Friendraiser! (And to those who couldn’t come – you were missed!) 

The start of the summer means something different to each of us – but what I believe we share, is the joy and delight of being in our beautiful region enjoying good food, laughter, friends and family.

If you are new to our community and haven’t signed up for the email list or officially joined friends of the Beaverkill, you can do so on our website. And as a reminder the $25 to join FOB goes to help us put on community events, take care of the church, bridge and other key landmarks, and protect the beautiful natural environment that makes the Beaverkill a place we love to live.

Till next time! 

Patricia, Simone and Josh 

Minutes FOBC Board Meeting

Contributed by Josh Grier May 2, 2018

The Board of FOBC had their first meeting of the 2018 season this past Saturday, April 28.  Attending were Ramsay Adams, Patricia Adams, Simone McGurl, Barbara Trelstad, Josh Grier and Jane Sokolow.  We thought the Friends might be interested in plans ahead for this Spring and Summer:

1. Simone and Mimi will host a “Friends Raiser” get-together at their house on Saturday, May 26 from 4-6pm.  This will be primarily a social event, however we will also have the annual meeting then – primarily to present and vote on  the slate of new officers up for consideration.  Invitations/announcements for this party will be handled by Simone and Jane – using our traditional methods (email and posting on the FOBC website) and a paperless post.  Simone is considering setting up an Instagram account, as well. 

2. If there is interest, two new committees will be established (Mary Hall and Bob Jones will continue to take care of the Beaverkill Church committee) :

a. A campsite committee, which will work with the NYSDEC (NY State Dept of Environmental Conservation) and OSI (Open Space Institute) — on ways to further enhance the campsite/picnic area by the beautifully restored covered bridge. DEC and OSI have funds to work on this area but need a local organization to partner with them. There are many ideas of things to do, but this will be discussed and decided by the new committee.  Josh will sign and send back to DEC the “Volunteer Stewardship Application,” which should establish the FOBC as the official local contact for these projects.

b. An archives/heritage committee. Barbara has collected and organized what photos and “hard copy” items we have for FOBC and will continue to catalogue and preserve these items. If  there is interest, we could start on a new series of interviews with people who have moved  here since the ‘70s. Most of the interviews for our “Stories of Beaverkill” were about Beaverkill River Valley before the ‘70s. 

3. The date for the summer picnic was set for Saturday, August 18, from 5pm on. Josh and Jane will work on establishing the locale and other details.

4. We look forward to having the new FOBC member directory completed soon, either in time for the May 26th  party or the August 18th  party.